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507th KC-135 Stratotanker gets a bath

Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker which was scheduled for its routine wash on May 5, 2013 in the hanger known as the fuel barn.

Aircraft go through a general wash cycle of 180 days unless they are sent into more corrosive environments.  Depending on the kind of environment the wash cycle changes to either 30, 60 or 120 days.  Flights conducted in salt water areas would be scheduled more often to ensure the salt does not corrode any parts.  

Although the aircraft is generally washed with aircraft soap and hot water, some chemicals are authorized for specific needs.

Once the entire aircraft has been thoroughly washed and rinsed, the joints and other parts will get re lubricated and inspected.

This aircraft being washed during the May Unit Training Assembly is good training for traditional reservists.  It not only gives them a chance to perform a through and proper wash along with re lubricating joints and other parts, but also gives them a chance to properly follow instructions from the technical order provided for a proper wash.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker which was scheduled for its routine wash on May 5, 2013 in the hangar also known as the fuel barn. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker which was scheduled for its routine wash on May 5, 2013 in the hangar known as the fuel barn. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker which was scheduled for its routine wash on May 5, 2013 in the hangar known as the fuel barn. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

Aircraft go through a general wash cycle of 180 days unless they are sent into more corrosive environments. Depending on the kind of environment the wash cycle changes to either 30, 60 or 120 days.

Water drops off a KC-135 during a aircraft wash here May 5. Aircraft go through a general wash cycle of 180 days unless they are sent into more corrosive environments. Depending on the kind of environment the wash cycle changes to either 30, 60 or 120 days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)

TINKER AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. -- Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, 507th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief rinses soap off the belly of a KC-135 Stratotanker which was scheduled for its routine wash on May 5, 2013 in the hangar also known as the fuel barn.

Aircraft go through a general wash cycle of 180 days unless they are sent into more corrosive environments. Depending on the kind of environment the wash cycle changes to either 30, 60 or 120 days. Flights conducted in salt water areas would be scheduled more often to ensure the salt does not corrode any parts.

Although the aircraft is generally washed with aircraft soap and hot water, some chemicals are authorized for specific needs.

Once the entire aircraft has been thoroughly washed and rinsed, the joints and other parts will get re-lubricated and inspected.

This aircraft being washed during the May Unit Training Assembly is good training for traditional reservists. It not only gives them a chance to perform a through and proper wash along with re- lubricating joints and other parts, but also gives them a chance to properly follow instructions from the technical order provided for a proper wash. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mark Hybers)